Office of Education


CSforAZ - Computer Science Initiative

 "I recognize the importance of computer science education in all grade levels. In lower grades, computer science curriculum develops necessary critical thinking and problem solving skills. In high school, rigorous computer science coursework prepares the student for high-paying workforce opportunities in the high-demand technology sector. With the support of industry partnerships, we will strive to improve access to computer science education in our schools by increasing professional development opportunities for existing and new computer science teachers." 
Governor Ducey, September 2017
 

Arizona Adopts Computer Science Standards
October 22, 2018

On October 22, 2018, Arizona's State Board of Education voted to adopt new K-12 Computer Science Standards. The process to develop new Computer Science Standards began in January 2017. Since that time, the Arizona Department of Education (ADE) has collected public feedback on existing standards and convened working groups of educators, content experts, community members, and parents to create new standards.  

Through the Arizona Computer Science Initiative & the Governor’s Partnership for K-12 Computer Science, Governor Ducey and Code.org have collaborated to advance computer science education statewide since 2017. In FY 2018, Governor Ducey proposed and received funding to advance the first phase of Arizona’s statewide computer science initiative through the development of computer science standards and professional development. The FY2019 budget included $2.5 million to expand the Governor’s Partnership for K-12 Computer Science pilot program and enable schools to offer high-quality, rigorous training for new computer science teachers.

Click here to find out more about Arizona's new Computer Science Standards.

Click here to download Arizona's Computer Science Standards.

NEW: 2018 State of Computer Science Education
September 2018

computer science graphic

In March 2017, a group of authors, including Code.org, published the State of the States Landscape Report, detailing each state’s status towards meeting the nine policies developed by the Code.org Advocacy Coalition. Since that report was released, 33 states have changed policies - 28 states changing policies just in 2018 alone. Furthermore, in states that have enacted more of these nine policies, a greater percentage of schools provide students access to K-12 computer science.

This report contains the status of computer science education policy across the nation and a first look at school-by-school data on the availability of computer science in high schools. Across 24 states, only 35% percent of high schools in the US teach computer science. In addition, Black and Hispanic students, students receiving free and reduced lunch, and students from rural areas are less likely to attend a school that provides access to this critical subject. It also includes includes updates on the national momentum and policy trends around computer science, maps showing states’ progress in enacting the nine policies, state-by-state summaries, and preliminary data on the percent of high schools teaching computer science from 24 states, including the relationship between policy adoption and implementation.

Download 2018 State of Computer Science Education Report.

Computer Science Professional Development Program

The goal of the Computer Science Professional Development (CSPD) Program is for school districts and charter schools to train teachers in computer science instruction that will lead to the offering of a computer science course in the near future. The funds from the Computer Science Professional Development Program Fund are intended to ensure all students have access to high quality computer science courses.

A.R.S. § 15-249.12 established the Computer Science Professional Development Program Fund consisting of monies appropriated by the state legislature, in addition to grants, gift, devices, and donations from any public or private sources. Monies in the fund are continuously appropriated and are exempt from the provisions relating to lapsing of appropriations. Participation in the Computer Science Professional Development Program is limited to the following:

      • School Districts and Charter Schools that offer instruction in grades 9 through 12 AND School Districts and Charter Schools that do not currently provide high school computer science instruction.

Applications for the Computer Science Professional Development Program open on September 5, 2018. Applications will be reviewed beginning the week of October 22, 2018 and will continue until all grant applications have been reviewed and/or all grant funds have been awarded. Applications are accepted, reviewed, and approved on a “first come, first-served basis.” It is anticipated that the initial applications that have been approved by the review panel will be presented to the State Board for approval at the December 2018 meeting. School Districts and Charter Schools that participate in the Computer Science Professional Development Program are required to submit an Annual Report by June 1, 2019.

In the FY2018 Budget, Governor Ducey included $1M for the creation of a computer science professional development program. To learn more about the FY2018 Education Budget, click here.

Click here to apply for Computer Science Professional Development Grant Funding.

Arizona teachers trained to integrate computer science in their classrooms
July 23, 2018

Two years ago, the principal at Fountain Hills High School asked teachers if they were interested in teaching computer science.

With no background in computer science, Randy Bragg stepped up to the challenge.

“We would really be doing a disservice to the kids if we’re not preparing them for this,” he said. “So I said, ‘Yeah, this sounds like something I want to do.’”

He now teaches an Advanced Placement computer science principles class. He’s part of a growing number of Arizona teachers who are getting trained in computer science and are passing on what they learn to their students. (Read More...)

NEW: #CSforAZSummit Will Be Held June 12

CSforAZ, in partnership with Arizona Department of Education, the Governor’s office, the Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College at ASU, and CSforALL is inviting districts and charter organizations to apply for a one-day summit “Designing K-12 CS Pathways.”

The summit will be held on June 12, 2018 at Arizona State University, West Campus from 8:30 am to 4:30 pm. (Click here for more information)

CS for AZ Summit

Governor Ducey Supports Computer Science Program For Native American Students
May 15, 2018

Governor Doug Ducey today signed SB 1505, providing $500,000 in funding to continue the Native American Code Writers Initiative Pilot Program. The program will expand opportunities for Native American high school students to learn computer coding skills and provide internship opportunities with industry partners, helping students develop their skills and identify future employment opportunities. The program will be administered through a collaboration between the Arizona Department of Education and the Native American Indian Advisory Council. (Read More...)

Computer science mania sweeps the United States
May 9, 2018

Throughout the United States, education leaders and policymakers are joining forces to bring computer science classes to our schools. Since January, 20 states from Alabama to Wyoming have passed laws and funded $49 million to expand access to and diversity in K-12 computer science.

Every student in every K-12 school deserves an opportunity to learn computer science. This gives students a chance to start on a pathway toward the highest-paying tech jobs; and because technology will impact every sector, computer science is foundational for any 21st-century career. The teacher-led movement for computer science now boasts 850,000 teachers, and education leaders and policymakers are responding to this grassroots support. 

These 20 states passed new laws or initiatives to support K-12 computer science (CS) since January of this year:

Find out more.

UA, Microsoft to Expand Computer Science Education
April 18, 2018

The University of Arizona has announced an expanded partnership with Microsoft Corp. to bring computer science education, through Microsoft's Technology, Education and Literacy in Schools, or TEALS, program, to more high school students in Tucson and southern Arizona, starting with the 2018-2019 school year. 

Microsoft will fund and hire a new TEALS regional manager to grow the reach of the program in the region. The manager will recruit new high schools to host the program and volunteers to staff it. Through its STEM Learning Center, the UA will connect students with opportunities to volunteer in TEALS classrooms. (Read More...)

Code Writers Initiative

Created in concert with Intel Corporation and Cisco Systems, with participation from a number of partnering organizations, SFAz’s Code Writers Education Initiative will outfit partnering K-12 schools on the Navajo Nation with distance learning technology focused on introducing computer code writing curriculum from kindergarten through high school and community college, in addition to using engaging technology subjects like robotics and cyber security to attract and teach students about the exciting opportunities available through STEM careers.

“The Code Writers Education Initiative will blow away classroom walls and bring the world’s most sophisticated learning environment to the Navajo Nation,” said Science Foundation Arizona’s STEM Network Director Ken Quartermain, Jr. “By teaching this generation computational learning, we help unleash the power of these young minds, and allow them to transform their lives, their families and their communities.”

The education initiative is aimed at attracting and retaining more Native American youth to STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) subjects and eventual careers. Currently, the US is lagging in the number of STEM-trained individuals in the country’s workforce; this is just one of SFAz’s STEM education programs focused on preparing Arizona’s workforce to compete globally. (Read More...)

CS Standards Development Timeline

CS standards development is set to begin. For more information on the tentative timeline, click here. For applications to join the working groups, apply here.

FY 2018 Budget: Computer Science

2.5 million announced to expand the Governor's Partnership for K-12 CS pilot program that will allow schools to offer high-quality, rigorous training for new computer science teachers

Announcement here.

How Does Teacher Leadership Play a Role in Advancing CS?

Learn from Alabama, Arkansas, and Virginia representatives who can shed light on the different approaches states are taking, how teachers are helping, and what you can do to advocate for CS in your state. To learn more, see the events calendar.

2018 CSTA/Infosys Foundation USA Awards for Teaching Excellence

The Computer Science Teachers Association (CSTA) and Infosys Foundation USA have announced the 2018 CSTA/Infosys Foundation USA Awards for Teaching Excellence. These awards celebrate the best computer science educators across the US and the world! The deadline to submit applications and nominations is January 22, 2018, and the awards are open to K-12 computer science teachers from around the globe. Hurry over to our sitefor more details on how to apply 

Code.org Professional Learning:

Whether you are new to teaching computer science (CS) or have experience teaching other CS courses, the program is designed to promote growth by providing space for you to become comfortable with curricular materials, CS content, and pedagogy. Our curriculum provides a complete set of lesson plans that include inquiry-based activities, videos, assessment support, and educational tools. Learn more and apply here.

UPCOMING EVENT: Building Pathways to Teaching Computer Science (Google for Education)
December 16, 2017

Date: Saturday, December 16th, 2017
Time: 10am PST
Watch Live

How to Join: Watch the live event on the Google for Education on YouTube channel. The agenda, session descriptions, and speakers will be available in the coming weeks.

Spread the word: Share this event with your network using this message on social media.

Want to learn more about #CS professional development? Tune in on Dec 16th for Building Pathways to Teaching Computer Science online summit

Amazon's Alexa Skills Challenge
Ends January 10, 2017

Amazon's online competition for building Alexa skills that educate, entertain, and engage kids under the age of 13. Youth ages 13 through 17 who submit an eligible certified skill will receive a limited-edition Echo Dot, 20 finalists will win $5,000 and promotion in the Alexa Skills Store, and the grand prize winner will receive $20,000. There’s also a $10,000 high school team bonus prize! Submissions are open now through January 10, 2018. Find more details at alexakidskills.devpost.com.

Calling all computer science educators (K-12 and higher education), industry partners, and parents!

The process to develop new Computer Science Standards is scheduled to begin late January. We hope you will consider applying for the opportunity to participate in this important work. The Arizona Department of Education is looking for K-12 educators, higher education/post-secondary educators, and industry partners from across the state to serve on the computer science standards working groups. The standards review process will use an accordion model for committee selection; an individual might be selected to serve once or multiple times, depending on the focus of the work and their expertise. Working group members who are unable to serve for a particular meeting due to schedule conflicts or other concerns are still eligible to be selected to participate in future meetings.

The ADE will be collecting public feedback to help guide the development of K-12 Computer Science Standards. Please take the survey by December 15, 2017 to leave your feedback.

Take the survey.

Governor's For CS Highlights #HourofCode with Governor Doug Ducey

Governor Ducey joins students in Arizona for an #HourofCode today to kick off Computer Science Education Week. (See More...)

GOVERNOR DUCEY JOINS STUDENTS IN CELEBRATING #CSEDWEEK
December 4, 2017

Hour of Code

Governor Ducey visited students and staff at Phoenix Coding Academy on December 4, 2017 to participate in #HourOfCode activities and proclaim December 4-10 as #CSEdWeek. During his visit, Governor Ducey toured the PCA  campus before joining leading tech industry partners to speak with students about the important opportunity computer science education provides them. The Governor also joined students in coding activities. (See more photos...)

ARIZONA COMPUTER SCIENCE STANDARDS DEVELOPMENT

The process to develop new Computer Science Standards is scheduled to begin late January. The Arizona Department of Education is looking for K-12 educators, higher education/post-secondary educators, and industry partners from across the state to serve on the computer science standards working groups. The standards review process will use an accordion model for committee selection; an individual might be selected to serve once or multiple times, depending on the focus of the work and their expertise. Working group members who are unable to serve for a particular meeting due to schedule conflicts or other concerns are still eligible to be selected to participate in future meetings. (Click here to find out more)

DEVELOPMENT OF K-12 COMPUTER SCIENCE STANDARDS TO BEGIN
October 2017

The Arizona Department of Education is seeking public comments to guide the process of developing K-12 Computer Science Standards. Please take the survey by November 30, 2017 to help inform and guide the development process.

The ADE is currently accepting applications from K-12 educators, higher education/post-secondary educators, business stakeholders, and parents/community members to serve on working groups and focus groups. We hope you will consider applying for the opportunity to participate in this important work. We would like to have representation from around the state. The standards review process will use an accordion model for committee selection; an individual might be selected to serve once or multiple times, depending on the focus of the work and their expertise. Members unable to serve for a particular meeting due to schedule conflicts or other concerns are still eligible to be selected to participate in future meetings. Applications will be accepted throughout the entire development process. Working groups will convene starting in January 2018.

Please visit ADE’s Computer Science Standards Development page to access the applications and for more information. 

INCREASING ACCESS TO HIGH-QUALITY SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, ENGINEERING, AND MATHEMATICS (STEM) EDUCATION
September 2017

On September 25th in the Oval Office, joined by dozens of students, President Donald J. Trump signed a Presidential Memorandum expanding access to high-quality Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) and Computer Science education to K-12 students. Now more than ever, STEM and Computer Science industries are playing a huge role in the vitality of our economy which is why high-quality education in these fields is so crucial.

Click here to read the facts on Memorandum for STEM Education Funding
Click here to read the full Presidential Memorandum for STEM Education Funding

GOVERNOR DUCEY SECURES FUNDING FOR DEVELOPMENT OF COMPUTER SCIENCE STANDARDS & PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
May 2017

The Governor is proud to be involved with Arizona's computer science initiative through the Governor's Partnership on Computer Science- a Code.org collaboration.

As part of the FY2018 budget, Governor Ducey proposed and received funding to advance the first phase of Arizona’s statewide computer science initiative, CSforAZ, through the development of computer science standards and professional development for all teachers with the goal of having all AZ high schools offering a computer science course.

Click here to get more information on CSforAZ                 

NEW REPORT TRACKS POLICY PROGRESS ON EXPANDING K-12 COMPUTER SCIENCE EDUCATION
April 2017

A new report describing the progress of U.S. states in achieving 10 policy priorities for improving and expanding K–12 computer science (CS) education was released today at a national workshop led by Google, EDC, and the Massachusetts Computing Attainment Network (MassCAN) on Google’s Cambridge campus. The report highlights key strategies and issues state leaders must address regarding CS education.

A group of leading CS education organizations co-authored State of the States Landscape Report: State-Level Policies Supporting Equitable K–12 Computer Science Education, with funding from BNY Mellon. The group includes the following:

      • EDC
      • Code.org
      • Education Commission of the States
      • NSF BPC Expanding Computing Education Pathways (ECEP) Alliance
      • Massachusetts Computing Attainment Network (MassCAN)
      • SageFox Consulting Group 

Click here to read the full press release.

Click here to download State of the States Landscape Report: State-Level Policies Supporting Equitable K–12 Computer Science Education.

GOVERNOR'S PARTNERSHIP FOR K-12 COMPUTER SCIENCE

Computing is a fundamental part of daily life, commerce, and just about every occupation in our modern economy. It is essential that students be exposed to the field of computer science in our K-12 system—as it is foundational in transforming the way students think about the world. Computer science teaches them not only about technology, but also about how to approach problems differently. Computer science puts students on the path toward some of the highest-paying, fastest-growing jobs in America.

Governor Ducey recognizes the essential roles of state leaders in advancing policy and allocating funding to expand K-12 computer science in our states and the importance of working collaboratively and efficiently with other state leaders to identify challenges and share promising practices.

To that end, Governor Ducey has announced his participation in the Governor's Partnership for K-12 Computer Science to work toward the following policies that will help meet the goal of increasing access to K-12 computer science in Arizona. Governor Ducey joins co-chairs Governor Asa Hutchinson (AR) and Governor Jay Inslee (WA), along with Governor Gina Raimond (RI), Governor Branstad (IA), Governor Terry McAuliffe (VA), Governor Brian Sandoval (NV) and Governor Butch Otter (ID) to work toward the three following policy priorities:

        • Enable all high schools to offer at least one rigorous computer science course; 
        • Fund professional learning opportunities so teachers can be prepared to teach these courses; and, 
        • Create a set of high-quality academic K-12 computer science standards to guide local implementation of courses.

Partnership members commit to work toward the three policy priorities listed above by engaging with Code.org and other partners to identify the appropriate institutions that have jurisdiction over these matters and creating plans for how to accomplish these goals. This may include creating task forces within the state that will be responsible for guiding the state toward these goals, working on legislative efforts, and including these items as a priority in the state budget.

The Partnership will also share best practices for computer science education reform, and advocate for federal policies that support the expansion of, and access to, K-12 computer science, including funding opportunities, flexibility, and policy change. The Partnership will raise awareness of state efforts to expand computer science education, focused on the 3 priority policy areas, both among Partnership members and to the public via the Partnership website. State plan development, task force creation, and other iterative steps in the policy and funding process will be reported as “working towards” goals in status updates. Legislative efforts, budget proposals, executive orders, and other policy advances will be tracked and shared, as well.

Code.org will provide the Partnership with resources related to best practices in policy and programs, and will facilitate collaboration among Governors and their staff, in person and virtually.

COMPUTER SCIENCE IN ARIZONA

Arizona computer science

Arizona computer science

 

• Arizona currently has 9,657 open computing jobs (2.8 times the average demand rate in Arizona). 
• The average salary for a computing occupation in AZ is $85,165, which is significantly higher than the average salary in the state ($45,310). 
• Arizona had only 484 university computer science graduates in 2014; only 15% were female. 
• In 2016, 438 high school students in Arizona took the AP Computer Science exam; only 23% were female; 62 students were Hispanic or Latino; 4 students were Black; 1 student was Native American and only 1 student was Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander. 
• Only 42 schools in AZ (13% of AZ schools with AP programs) offered the AP Computer Science course in the 2015-2016 school year. There are fewer AP exams taken in computer science than in any other STEM subject area.

SUPPORT K-12 COMPUTER SCIENCE EDUCATION IN ARIZONA

Arizona computer science

Computer science drives job growth and innovation throughout our economy and society. Computing occupations are the number 1 source of all new wages in the U.S. and make up two-thirds of all projected new jobs in STEM fields, making Computer Science one of the most in-demand college degrees. And computing is used all around us and in virtually every field. It’s foundational knowledge that all students need. But computer science is marginalized throughout education. Fewer than half of U.S. schools offer any computer science courses and only 8% of STEM graduates study it. We need to improve access for all students, including groups who have traditionally been underrepresented.

RESOURCES

Science Foundation Arizona 
Arizona STEM Network
CSforAZ
Tech/Prep
Code Writers Initiative

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